CHORD TONE SOLOING BY BARRETT TAGLIARINO PDF

His field-tested courses are designed to get serious guitar students to understand and play the music they want with no time wasted. Barrett uses and teaches standard terminology to prepare musicians to communicate clearly on the job. He is an L. Instruction Books, Videos Jazz Soloing Basics for Guitar: A step-by-step method for learning jazz phrasing with chromaticism and swing-feel lines Apply modal and chord-scale theory, use arpeggio substitution to create extended sounds, and learn when and when not to play dissonant notes. Once you know the fretboard, you still have to know which notes to play, and when!

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We want to play the fourth note with the middle finger, so that the next one can use the ring finger, saving the pinky for the sixth note, which is on the same fret as the one before.

That is a situation that requires special care. I avoid using the same finger twice in a row unless it is for a specific sound. These decisions may seem impossible to accomplish on the fly as you solo, but the idea is that you train your reflexes to do things while practicing so that they are automatic later. Here is an excerpt from my upcoming book on technique and interval studies still in the draft stage which helps with the fingering challenge you mentioned: multiple single notes on the same fret but different strings.

Technique The Fretting Hand As a general rule, use one finger per fret. Some scale patterns cover more than four frets and will require a position shift. Use the pinky or 4th finger just as much as the others. It may feel weak at first, and there will be situations like string bends where you may substitute the 3rd finger for it later.

But now you should make the commitment to use it. Go Lightly You should push the string onto the fret with the minimum pressure required to get a clean note with no buzz.

Any more than that will waste energy, slow you down, and also possibly cause the note to go out of tune. Try steadily picking a string, and gently touch the fretting finger to it, right behind the fretwire, slowly increasing the pressure until the note sounds clearly.

You may be surprised at how little force is required, as long as your thumb is centered behind the neck.

The First Challenge There will be many times when you will follow a note with another one on the same fret but a different string. This can be hard to play cleanly. If you just lift the same fingertip up and put it down on another string, there will be a gap between the notes during the time your finger is in transit, and the still-vibrating string will sound its open note during that time.

There are two ways to deal with this situation, and I recommend practicing both. The first can be summed up by saying, "avoid using the same finger twice in a row. Assume you have two notes on the 5th fret, on adjacent strings. Play the low note with the index finger and the higher one with the middle finger. This order is preferred over the opposite, which can tilt your hand into a slightly awkward position though in rare cases it will be necessary.

It gives you clean, solid-sounding tones. Applying it to the interval studies will teach your reflexes to plan ahead for proper execution of notes that are coming up. Play the lower note with the fingertip, and then roll the finger over by unflexing the last joint, to play the higher note with the pad of the finger.

The tip should roll off and damp the lower note so that only the higher one is now heard. Flexing is when you curl the finger more, the opposite of extending. The two notes should not ring together as a chord unless that is specifically what you want. Work on minimizing that rocking hand motion in this little finger-rolling exercise.

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Chord Tone Soloing

We want to play the fourth note with the middle finger, so that the next one can use the ring finger, saving the pinky for the sixth note, which is on the same fret as the one before. That is a situation that requires special care. I avoid using the same finger twice in a row unless it is for a specific sound. These decisions may seem impossible to accomplish on the fly as you solo, but the idea is that you train your reflexes to do things while practicing so that they are automatic later. Here is an excerpt from my upcoming book on technique and interval studies still in the draft stage which helps with the fingering challenge you mentioned: multiple single notes on the same fret but different strings. Technique The Fretting Hand As a general rule, use one finger per fret.

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